Resource Library

Page 4 of 103 pages. This page shows results 61 - 80 of 2053 total results.
  Research

Key takeaways:

  • This study provides a comprehensive list of high-level, anti-displacement strategies and resources to support building healthy communities. This menu of strategies was produced in part to support public health practitioners helping communities advance healthy community design projects.
  • Improvements in low-income communities to address walkability and improve access to parks and transit may lead to higher property costs and increased housing costs, displacing existing residents who do not reap the benefits of healthy community design.
  • This article identifies 141 strategies for mitigating and preventing displacement.  Strategies were grouped by the following topology: preservation, protection, inclusion, revenue generation, incentives/disincentives, property acquisition, stabilization of resources, community engagement/education, and cross-cutting policies that require cross-agency coordination.
  • A single strategy alone is unlikely to prevent displacement. Rather, a combination of multiple strategies is required to ensure that residents can benefit from community investments that improve community health while assuring that they are not displaced because of these neighborhood improvements.

Community engagement and education is one of the categories of strategies. This strategy includes engaging low-income and communities of color in community planning processes and ensuring resident representation and participation. It also includes increasing knowledge about displacement and providing education on land use planning and policy-making to equip local residents and youth with how to influence those changes in their own

  Webinar

On Tuesday, January 24th from 11 am to noon Mountain, the Colorado Department of Transportation is hosting a free webinar presented by the Safe Routes Partnership.

  Research

Key takeaways:

  • This study seeks to reframe the narrative around transportation accessibility as a form of epistemic justice, valuing the knowledge of low-income people of color, as well as the diversity of knowledge they hold.
  • “Lived expertise” or lived experience, the researchers argue, should be valued as part of a holistic understanding of transportation accessibility.
  • Quantitative data – such as which demographic groups walk, bike, drive, and use public transportation - and technical language about the condition (or existence) of roads, sidewalks, bike lanes, and transit often takes the spotlight from individuals and groups who live in neighborhoods being studied for transportation research.
  • Framing transportation inequities solely on quantitative data detracts from the lived experience of a neighborhood – access to a car, cost of travel, proximity or structure of the transportation system, and physical limitations or disabilities.
  • Perception is a factor that cannot be quantified. Lived experiences tell the story of harassment, fear for personal safety, fear of certain public spaces, interactions with police, and social judgment.
  • Generating local knowledge derived from lived experiences of low-income people of color requires talking and, more importantly, listening.

With the Georgia Senate runoff results decided on December 6, 2022, the mid-term election officially comes to a close, and we can take stock of what it means for walking, bicycling, and Safe Routes to School in this upcoming Congress.  

  Research

Key takeaways:

  • Using the mobility justice framework means recognizing the challenges and inequities that low-income youth of color face (particularly regarding active transportation) and integrating their knowledge into the transportation decision-making process.
  • This study employed community-based participatory research, specifically photovoice, which uses photography and storytelling to set priorities and advocate for change. Through a series of sessions, the five domains known as the 5 D’s of the Mobility Justice
  • The 5 D’s of Mobility Justice for Youth have been adapted from the mobility justice conceptual framework model from People for Mobility Justice.

venn diagram

  • Providing free transit was one policy solution identified to reduce inequitable access to public transportation. This policy has received pushback due to unproven, non-materialized fears that such a policy would lead to an increase in problematic passengers, that would dissuade ridership.
  • Youth in this study also recommended well-lit, connected sidewalks, leading to public transportation, green spaces, and community hubs, to increase perceptions of safety and comfort with neighborhood mobility.
  Webinar

On Wednesday, December 14th from 11 am to noon Mountain, the Colorado Department of Transportation is hosting a free webinar presented by the Safe Routes Partnership.

Last month, the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) concluded its 2022 Go Human Mini-Grants Program, which funded 26 safety and engagement projects a

  Research

Key takeaways:

  • A community concern of “tactical urbanism” - low-cost, temporary changes to streets and roadways to increase safety, especially for people walking and biking – is that such changes increase traffic congestion and negatively impact local businesses. The findings of this case study indicate otherwise and that rather than increasing traffic, tactical urbanism contributes to “traffic evaporation” – a decrease in traffic flow following a decrease in road space.
  • The study measured the relative changes in traffic following the implementation of multiple tactical urbanism interventions on eleven streets in Barcelona, Spain, during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Four areas were studied: intervention streets (directly impacted by changes), adjacent streets (parallel to where changes took place), buffer streets (within 1/3 mile of where changes took place), and control streets (greater than 1/3 mile from where changes took place). Following the changes, traffic decreased significantly on the intervention streets, without a corresponding increase in the other three areas.

November 2022 marks the first anniversary of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, and we are celebrating by unveiling our new Transportation Alternatives Program tracking tool!

Every quarter, we look at how state departments of transportation (DOTs) are getting Transportation Alternatives Program money out the door so that it can build biking and walking infrastructure and support Safe Routes to School programs. Here’s the scoop on what we track and why it matters for state and local bicycle, pedestrian, and Safe Routes to School advocates updated to account for changes to the program in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

  Webinar

On Wednesday, November 30th from 11 am to noon Mountain, the Colorado Department of Transportation is hosting a free webinar presented by the Safe Routes Partnership.

In 1969, the Nixon Administration hosted the first ever White House Conference on Hunger, and it resulted in the creation of the school lunch program and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). In September 2022, the Biden-Harris Administration held the first White House Conference on Hunger since that initial conference over fifty years ago and established ambitious, yet attainable goals.

  Fact Sheet

Funding reflects priorities. State funding allocations, grant programs, project selection criteria, and technical assistance programs shape communities across the state. This fact sheet covers how states prioritize goals like equity, local planning, and project implementation by incentivizing actions that move communities toward those goals. It includes examples from multiple states to serve as inspiration and ideas for how to connect these approaches to Safe Routes to Parks initiatives.

  Fact Sheet

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law made many positive changes to the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP), including a new requirement that states define high-need communities and prioritize them in TAP project selection. Use this factsheet to see how states currently define high-need communities as part of their TAP application process and the variety of opportunities states can use to prioritize and support them.

  Fact Sheet

Federal funding for local park, trail, and active transportation projects can be transformative for a community! This fact sheet profiles several
federal funding sources that have the potential to support infrastructure improvements that increase access to everyday destinations, especially parks and greenspace.

  Fact Sheet

Communities are healthier when people can use and access parks and green spaces. This resource provides actionable strategies and inspiring examples for public health agencies to take an active role in their communities’ Safe Routes to Parks efforts.

  Fact Sheet

States manage significant funding that can support Safe Routes to Parks.  This factsheet lays out how states can use grant guides and project  election criteria to prioritize projects backed by meaningful community engagement.

One of my favorite parts of Safe Routes to School is celebrating community. In my day-to-day work, I’m inspired by stories of Safe Routes programs bringing people together. Parents and engineers going on walk audits. School staff and elected officials celebrating Walk and Roll to School Day. Safe Routes to School coordinators and rotary club members installing new bike racks. Neighbors and non-profits organizing school streets pilot projects.

A couple of weekends ago, I took my son out for a special mom-and-son breakfast. As is typical of a four-year-old, he is on his millionth question of the day when he asks the waiter what his name is.