Those Who Celebrate Together, Change Policy Together: Southern California Association of Governments’ General Assembly

Pauline ChowLast week, the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) convened the annual Regional Conference and General Assembly (GA) in Palm Desert for two days. The GA is a yearly convening of elected officials from across Southern California to celebrate the accomplishments of the past year.

New Transportation Tech: What’s in it for Safe Routes to School and Active Transportation Advocates

UCLA Digital CitiesThe technologies drawing attention are user-centric that allow both users and providers to interact and share information about the transportation network. Active transportation and Safe Routes to Schools advocates should care about these trends because they are expanding transportation options, promoting active lifestyles and tipping the political scales towards multi-modalism in planning and implementation.The digital space is using the influx of information (i.e. big data) to find patterns and efficiencies in the transportation system. These mobile and web applications are facilitating supportive programs and policies for walking, bicycling and Safe Routes to School, even when active transportation is not the immediate focus of mobile and web applications. Safe Routes to School supporters will be able to better partner with transportation agencies, organizations and advocates, if they stay alert to the culture changes that technology is causing within transportation.

First, I posit that ride and car-sharing services will bolster walkable and bikeable communities. I see many ways that students and families will be supported and encouraged to be car-free or car-limited with more reliable alternative networks, such as ride and car-share, cross jurisdictional bicycle and pedestrian networks and public transportation. Ridesharing mobile applications like Uber, Lyft, and Sidecar are booming and flipped the script on taxi and car services and local job creation. Users of ride share applications can name their price for trips with Lyft and benefit (or suffer) with surge pricing with Uber. Potentially communities benefits in the strengthening of ride and car-share through crowdsourcing affordability and flexibility. Paratransit riders - usually the elderly and persons with disability - are also frequent users of ride-shares. Additionally, car sharing companies like Zipcar allow drivers to rent a car by the hour, where prices include insurance and maintenance. Personally, I know families that would benefit from having better access to alternative networks to get children to school and after-school activities. One family in particular was forced to give up their car free lifestyle when the local Zipcar location was closed. These technologies are means to fill in the transportation gaps for communities and families.

Regional Active Transportation Planning – a Portland Metro Case Study

kariThe Portland, Oregon region, in many regards, is ahead of the curve when it comes to active transportation. The “Bike Bill” (ORS 366.514), passed more than 40 years ago by the Oregon Legislature in 1971, requires the inclusion of facilities for pedestrians and bicyclists wherever a road, street or highway is built or rebuilt.

MOU Will Strengthen Active Transportation in San Bernardino County

Adoption of SANBAG MOU with SCAG Public CommentsIn early November 2013, the San Bernardino Association of Governments (SANBAG) board adopted a historic Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) (Item 7) with the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG). The MOU commits the two agencies to working together on projects related to the implementation of the 2012 Regional Transportation Plan and Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS). While the RTP/SCS is mandated by SB 375, state legislation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through trying land use and transportation planning in the RTP process, the MOU is strictly voluntary.

The MOU between SCAG and SANBAG demonstrates both agencies’ commitment to the policies, projects and strategies set forth in the 2012 RTP/SCS. It is important for County Transportation Commissions (CTCs) to show commitment to implementation of plans and policies.

Specific planning projects are included in SANBAG’s MOU that will transform San Bernardino County into a more walkable and bikeable place, improve the public health outcomes of its residents and help increase the number of children walking and bicycling to school. The MOU incorporates items recommended in the San Bernardino Active Transportation Vision, statistics and policy recommendations developed by stakeholders from San Bernardino County, including SANBAG staff, San Bernardino County Department of Public Health, Omnitrans, Safe Routes to School National Partnership, American Lung Association, MoveIE and Inland Empire Bicycle Alliance.

Providing New TAP Resources for MPOs

Stephanie WeberOn July 22, Margo Pedroso and I joined Advocacy Advance to host a webinar reviewing the year since MAP-21 passed.

Plan Bay Area Adopted! But Our The San Francisco Bay Area Still Needs a Bigger Investment in Active Transportation

Marty MartinezNearly three years in the making, Plan Bay Area was approved by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), in an after-midnight vote early in the morning of July 19. Plan Bay Area will have massive significant impacts on active transportation, public transit, housing, and other f

A Hard-Fought Win in the San Francisco Bay Area for Bicycling and Walking

Marty MartinezOn Wednesday, June 26, the Bay Area’s metropolitan planning organization (MPO), the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), voted to keep a requirement that cities and towns maintain Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committees (BPACs) to receive certain state funds. They also voted to strengthen this requirement, stipulating that BPACs review not only bicycle projects but also pedestrian projects.

WATCH OUT! Adding Adrenaline to Pedestrian Safety Campaigns

Catherine Baker“Wear lights, especially at night,” “no texting while walking,” “make them see you.” It seems to be that time of year in the Greater Washington, D.C. metro region where every jurisdiction is finishing up or rebranding their Pedestrian Safety Campaigns.

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