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Why is “Safety” So Complex?

Look both ways. Wear your helmet. We’ve all heard these maxims about safety, and probably shared them a time or two.

Aside from distance to school, safety is a leading factor for both adults and children in the decision to participate in physical activity and walk or bike to school (Nasar, 2015; Zhou et al., 2009). However, adopting those individual protective behaviors will not provide an easy solution. This blog post will unpack three reasons why the concept of safety, particularly in the context of safe travel to school, can be challenging to conceptualize and achieve.

The Wheels on the Bus: Gathering the Evidence for Walking School Buses

This blog post was written by our research advisor, Christina Galardi.

As Safe Routes to School practitioners, schools, parents, and community partners work together to make it easier and safer for kids to walk to school, it is important to understand barriers to participation and how we can effectively address them. In this research beat, we’ve gathered the academic literature on Walking School Buses to share evidence and key takeaways.

A Primer on NHTSA’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Dollars

When we talk about federal transportation dollars in this space, we most often focus on the Transportation Alternatives Program, since it has a strong focus on funding Safe Routes to School programs and bicycling and walking infrastructure.

Training Wheels: Biking Safety Education Curriculum

This blog post was written by the National Partnership's research reviewer, Christina Galardi.

“It’s just like riding a bike.”

This is an expression we often use to refer to a learned skill that comes naturally and is retained for a lifetime.

But how do you learn to ride a bike—and do so safely—in the first place?

kids on bikes

Alex Smith: Coordinating Large District School Travel Plans to Improve Walking and Biking to School in Columbus, Ohio

While we could only give one Hubsmith award, we were impressed by all of the dedicated individuals who were nominated for an award. We’ll be profiling each of the nominees over the next few months and look forward to lifting up great work from all around the country.

Confessions of a Tokenized Advocate

This blog post was co-written by National Partnership staff Keith Benjamin, community partnerships manager, and Mikaela Randolph, community engagement and evaluation manager.

group photo"Sometimes we have to tokenize ourselves for the sake of pushing the movement forward."

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