Bike to School Day is Just Around the Corner on May 8th. Are You In, North Carolina?

Terry LandsellBike to School Day is just around the corner on May 8th. Are you in, North Carolina?

Across North Carolina there are so many great Safe Routes to School programs in place at hundreds of schools. You can visit most any of those schools now and see bikes being parked at bike racks and parents leading kids in their walk to and from school. 

Bay Area Increases Walking and Bicycling – and Research Shows We’ll Reap Health Benefits

Marty MartinezNew data released from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the Bay Area’s Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), shows that rates of bicycling and walking have increased throughout the region.  

Director's Outlook: Raising the Drumbeat for Active Transportation and Public Health

Deb HubsmithEvery year since 2005, the public health community has celebrated the first week of April as National Public Health Week, led by our long-standing partner affiliate, the American Public Health Association.  And this year, one of the main themes of National Public Health Week, “Providing a Saf

Re-Thinking How We Message Safe Routes to School on the Hill

Margo PedrosoAt the National Bike Summit this year, Douglas Meyer from Bernuth & Williamson presented some fascinating results about what Congressional allies and opponents think about bicycling. The League of American Bicyclists hired Meyer to conduct in-depth interviews with a wide range of individuals on the Hill—and while the questions were about bicycling, they are instructive for Safe Routes to School.

Spring Forward with Active Living Research Meeting Highlights

Jane WardUse the extra energy and daylight of this springtime of year to help more children walk, hop, skip or bicycle to school. The Active Living Research annual conference, held in February 2013, highlighted research relevant to Safe Routes to School that can help you show the proven benefits of your program.

Two of the session presentations are highlighted below:

How Far Can You Go In 0.4 Miles?

Christy SmithI recently had the opportunity to speak to Mayor Carolyn Thompson of Elkton, Tennessee. Elkton has fewer than 20,000 residents and is about twenty-five miles north of Huntsville, Alabama. Elkton has one elementary school with 327 students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. They also do not have any sidewalks in their town.

Be a Part of the Action: Join the Ohio Safe Routes Network!

Kate MoeningOhio is a leader in the national Safe Routes to Schools movement. Here are just a few benchmarks and accomplishments in our great state:

Engaging and Educating State Level Decision-Makers

Dave CowanSafe Routes to School has the amazing capacity to stretch its boundaries across the fields of health, transportation, safety, environment and more. This elasticity is an enormous advantage in terms of marketing the benefits of walking and bicycling to and from school as an effective approach to addressing major issues in all fields.

Success Through Collaboration in Florida

carol pulleyOf 52 documented Complete Streets policies in Florida, more than 20 were passed in 2012-2013. Florida network members were instrumental in the success of many of these policies. Some of these have been highlighted on the Safe Routes to School Florida network webinar and put on the National Partnership website as blogs.

Update from the Nevada Safe Routes to School Program

The Nevada statewide Safe Routes to School program is in its third round of national Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding. Funding started in 2008 and the third round of SAFETEA-LU money is funded in 2012 and 2013. The state program covers the major urban areas in the state along with rural areas with a mixture of infrastructure and non-infrastructure projects. Approximately $10 million dollars has been spent or committed so far. There have been 25 projects with 12 partners in the state. 

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