Those Who Celebrate Together, Change Policy Together: Southern California Association of Governments’ General Assembly

Pauline ChowLast week, the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) convened the annual Regional Conference and General Assembly (GA) in Palm Desert for two days. The GA is a yearly convening of elected officials from across Southern California to celebrate the accomplishments of the past year.

What’s at Stake This Spring in Congress

Margo PedrosoIf you have been paying attention to how Congress has handled transportation over the past several years, you’d be justified in thinking that this May’s expiration of the MAP-21 transportation law will get pushed back by months and that you don’t need to pay attention to transportation this spring.

Congress Casts About for Transportation Funding Solution

PedrosoAs the new Congress convenes, pressure is on legislators to keep transportation dollars flowing.  The current transportation law, MAP-21, expires in just four months in May 2015.

New Report: North Carolina - Writing the Next Chapter of Its Transportation Legacy

reportThis week, the Safe Routes to School National Partnership published a new report, “North Carolina: Writing the Next Chapter of Its Transportation Legacy."  The report is being released as the newest NC General Assembly convenes in Raleigh, and calls for state legislators and age

50 Years After Selma, Taking a Stand for Health Equity and the Right to Walk Safely

MLK JrThis month saw the release of the highly anticipated film "Selma." Structured around three protest marches in 1965, the film follows Martin Luther King Jr. and many other civil rights leaders as they risked their lives in three attempts to walk the 54-mile highway from Selma to Alabama state capital Montgomery in defiance of segregation and oppression.

In the Wake of the Midterm Elections, Some Big Changes Coming to Capitol Hill

The results of the November 4th elections were exactly what pollsters and political prognosticators had been indicating since early summer: a number of Republican pickups in the House, and enough wins in the Senate to take control for the first time since 2008. You can read more about the changes coming to Congress and what that might mean for walking and biking programs in our latest federal policy blog.

Safe Routes to School in Rural (Yes, Rural) New Jersey

Nora ShepardMost people think of New Jersey as an urban place -- after all, it has the highest population density in the country. There are many dense urban cities and suburban communities, but there are also large rural areas with small towns and open spaces. Contrary to what you might initially think, there are lessons to be learned in New Jersey about Safe Routes to School in rural settings.

Two New Publications Highlight Federal Safe Routes to School Policy

This week, the Safe Routes to School National Partnership published a new policy report with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, entitled Safe Routes to School: How States are Adapting to a New Legislative Framework. Additionally, we updated our Snapshot of State Implementation of the Transportation Alternatives Program. While both provide a still incomplete picture of how Safe Routes to School is faring under the now two-year-old Transportation Alternatives Program, the report in particular gives some reason for optimism. Read more about both on this month's federal policy blog.

Walking and Rolling to School in San Francisco

Walk and Roll to School Day was on October 8, and I participated in an amazing event with Mayor Ed Lee and members of San Francisco’s Safe Routes to School partnership. Nearly 90 schools and 14,000 children across San Francisco participated in the record-breaking event. More than 85 percent of San Francisco Unified School District elementary schools participated, growing the event by ten percent this year.

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