Our Publications

The following publications are produced by the Safe Routes to School National Partnership (National Partnership) for use in promoting and documenting the success and goals of the national Safe Routes to School movement.

National Partnership Brochure and Annual Reports

Safe Routes to School National Partnership Brochure
Our brochure summarizes the national Safe Routes to School movement and the goals of the National Partnership. Download or request copies of the National Partnership brochure. Take a look at the National Partnership’s new promo piece.

2013 Annual Report
The 2013 Annual Report highlights a year of accelerating momentum and support for creating healthy, active communities across the U.S. and advancing the Safe Routes to School movement nationwide.

2012 Annual Report
The 2012 Annual Report details how the National Partnership continued to support Safe Routes to School programs, advance policy change for safer and more active communities, and encourage healthy community design that enhances safety, livability and the quality of life in urban, rural, and suburban communities.

2011 Annual Report 
The 2011 Annual Report shows how the National Partnership is creating safer streets and routes, improving communities and promoting physical activity for children and their families all across America. The Annual Report shows that our work focused on four main strategies – federal advocacy, state and regional policy change, local technical assistance and engaging families, and sharing best practices – and shows how we are continuing to catalyze and lead the Safe Routes to School movement nationwide.

2010 Annual Report 
The 2010 Annual Report highlights the National Partnership’s growth and progress on our four main strategies – federal advocacy and lobbying, state and regional policy change, local technical assistance and sharing best practices.

2014 Publications

Buses, Boots and Bicycles: Exploring Collaboration Between Safe Routes to School and School Busing Professionals to Get Children to School Safely and Healthily
Student transportation departments have the potential to focus on more than just busing students to school. This report presents a comprehensive look at student transportation in the United States and proposes ways that Safe Routes to School professionals and transportation directors could collaborate more effectively to ensure that all children safely access their local schools.

Safe Routes to School District Policy Workbook
This interactive tool is designed to help school board members, administrators, families of students, and community members create and implement district policies that support active transportation and Safe Routes o School programs . The workbook will walk you through a series of policy options to help you build your own customized Safe Routes to School policy, which you can download and use in your community. The workbook was written and designed through a collaboration between the Safe Routes to School National Partnership and ChangeLab Solutions.

School Board Members and the Shared Use of School Facilities
School boards have a crucial role to play in supporting shared use in school districts. This two page report includes suggestions for shared use advocates working with school boards to advance shared use.

School Principals and the Shared Use of School Facilities
Principals are responsible for supporting the academic success of their students and also for acting as a liaison to parents and the community. Principals can play a key role in championing shared use in their school systems.

Shared Use: Increasing Access to Physical Activity Opportunities
This resource presents an overview of the opportunties and challenges for advancing shared use agreements and offers examples of shared use in urban, suburban, and rural settings. This document is also available in Spanish: Uso Compartido: Aumentar el Acceso a la Actividad Física.

Superintendents and the Shared Use of School Facilities
Superintendents are the chief administrators for school districts. They work to implement the vision and policies that the school board establishes. Superintendents can play a critical role in supporting shared use.

Using Safe Routes to School to Combat the Threat of Violence
In some communities, the danger of violence and crime discourages children from walking to school and keeps people off the street, limiting physical activity and restricting errands and trips. Using a framework known as the “Six E’s,” we identify specific kinds of actions that can combat violence and support Safe Routes to School.

Using the Transportation Alternatives Program of MAP-21 to Impact Your Local Community
Many local communities are eager to use transportation funding streams to create safe streets for people walking and bicycling. The new federal transportation law – Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century or MAP-21 – has created a variety of new programs and complexities about how to access funding to support healthy modes of getting around. This fact sheet helps get communities started with using the new Transportation Alternatives Program to support healthy community design and active transportation.

2013 Publications

A Framework for GIS and Safe Routes to School
As Safe Routes to School programs have increased across the country, a clear need for better data management at the national level has become apparent. In light of this, the Technical Assistance department brought 15 experts from various GIS-related fields to Austin, Texas in April 2013 to discuss ways that GIS could be better utilized in Safe Routes to School initiatives and what needs to be done to create a national bike/ped database. A Framework for GIS and Safe Routes to School presents the ideas and recommendations that were discussed at the meeting and was created with the goal that it will advance conversations regarding the ways that GIS can assist Safe Routes to School efforts.

Addressing Childhood Obesity Through Shared Recreational Facilities
This two page document outlines strategies to increase physical activity through the shared use of recreational facilities.

Maximizing City Involvement in Safe Routes to School: Educating Municipal Transportation Departments
These action briefs are a companion to the webinar that took place on June 20, 2013. Watch an audio-visual recording here. View Powerpoint slides: Gabe Graff, City of Portland- slides; Nancy Nichols, City of Fort Collins - slides.

Maximizing District-Wide Impact of Safe Routes to School: Educating  Principals and School Boards
These action briefs are a companion to the webinar that took place on May 16, 2013. Watch an audio-visual recording here. View Powerpoint slides: Sara Zimmerman, ChangeLabs Solutions - slides; Priscilla Cox, Elk Grove Unified School District - slides, Michelle Jenkins, Elitha Donner Elementary School - slides

Maximizing District-Wide Impact of Safe Routes to School: Educating School District Transportation Departments
These action briefs are a companion to the webinar that took place on April 18, 2013. Watch an audio-visual recording here. View Powerpoint slides: Dan Pires, Eureka City Schools - slides; Peter Hurst,  Boulder Valley School District - slides.

Maximizing the Local Impact of Safe Routes to School: Educating Local Elected Officials
These action briefs are a companion to the webinar that took place on March 21, 2013. Watch an audio-visual recording here. View Powerpoint slides: Stephanie Ramirez, National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Educational Fund - slides; Robert Ping, Safe Routes to School National Partnership - slides;Andy Peri, Marin County Bicycle Coalition  - slides.

Maximizing Statewide Impact of Safe Routes to School: Educating Governors and State Agency Leaders
These action briefs are a companion to the webinar that took place on February 21, 2013. Watch an audio-visual recording here. View Powerpoint slides: Jeanie Ward-Waller, Safe Routes to School National Partnership - slides; Jay Thompson, Safe Routes to School National Partnership - slides; James Wilson, Bike Delaware - slides

New Funding, New Partners, New Game 201: How to Build Safe Routes to School into Regional Governments
These action briefs are a companion to the webinar that took place on January 10, 2013. Watch an audio-visual recording here. View Powerpoint slides: Darren Flushe’s slides; Sean Co’s slides; Bridget Enderle’s slides; Melissa Kramer-Badtke’s slides

2012 Publications

Promoting Active Transportation: An Opportunity for Public Health
With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active transportation, with public health practitioners playing a key role. The American Public Health Association and the National Partnership have partnered to produce a guide: Promoting Active Transportation: An Opportunity for Public Health. This primer is intended to give an introduction and orientation to as to why and how health should be considered in transportation planning and decision-making — in particular through active transportation — and the role that public health practitioners can play.

Safe Routes to School and Traffic Pollution: Get Children Moving and Reduce Exposure to Unhealthy Air
The National Partnership produced this air quality resource guide
with Consulting for Health, Air, Nature, & a Greener Environment, LLC (CHANGE). It is our hope that this guide inspires practitioners around the country to pursue actions that reduce traffic pollution while also encouraging and enabling more children to safely walk and bicycle in cleaner air. This publication examines the following: the health impacts on children from exposure to traffic pollution; how Safe Routes to School programs can potentially impact children’s exposure to traffic pollution; and strategies and practice approaches that can mitigate exposure to traffic pollution. This publication was made possible through support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Public Health Association.

Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Advancing Safe Routes to School at the County Level
In 2009, 50 communities across the country were selected to participate in Communities Putting Prevention to Work , a stimulus-funded project that worked at the county-level to increase opportunities for healthy eating and active living through policy, systems and environmental changes. Many of these communities adopted Safe Routes to School as an overall strategy and spent the duration of the project pursuing opportunities to institutionalize policies, systems and environmental changes that would support walking and bicycling to school and in daily life. The efforts of five of these communities are highlighted in this report published by the Safe Routes to School National Partnership.

2011 Publications

Bicycle and Pedestrian Curricula Guide: Making the Case for Bicycle and Pedestrian Youth Education
This guide, created through a contract from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is intended to give Safe Routes to School practitioners, teachers, school administrators and others the necessary background information to fully understand the positive benefits of teaching bicycle and pedestrian education in the classroom, and to provide these audiences with easy access to currently available curricula. The guide and its accompanying inventory are organized into descriptive categories that will help in choosing the right curriculum for specific classroom needs. The guide was created through the help of several dozen bicycle and pedestrian education leaders throughout the country; we thank everyone who assisted for their help and contributions. If you were unable to submit your curriculum for review, you can fill out this form to have your curriculum added to an online database which will be updated periodically.

Safe Routes to School State Network Project Final Report, 200-2011: Phase II - Successes and Lessons Learned
This report includes policy successes, lessons learned and local success stories that were a result of policy changes led by the 20 state network coalitions. Key policy wins from each of the 19 network states and the District of Columbia included improvements to state Safe Routes to School programs that increased award and obligation rates for local community grant recipients and lower-income communities, policies creating street-scale improvements for walking and bicycling, school siting and shared use agreements, supporting lower-income communities and improving personal safety.

Safe Routes to School: Helping Communities Save Lives and Dollars
The report, focused on selling Safe Routes to School in tough economic times, shares new data, dollar figures and facts about the wide-ranging benefits of the federal Safe Routes to School program and illustrates them with local success stories. It can show policymakers how critical Safe Routes to School investments are to the safety and well-being of our children—and the cities and towns in which they live. We have also prepared a new Safe Routes to School fact sheet that includes excerpts from the report that you can download and use whenever you talk about Safe Routes to School.

Safe Routes to School Local Policy Guide
The Safe Routes to School Local Policy Guide was published to help local communities and schools create, enact and implement policies which will support active and healthy community environments that encourage safe walking and bicycling and physical activity by children through a Health in All Policies approach. The National Partnership plans to continue to catalog and publicize policy wins that promote Safe Routes to School. If you have an example, please email the details to Margaux Mennesson.

Working Together to Advance Safe Routes to School
This 2-page document describes the main national organizations and entities supporting and advancing Safe Routes to School - Federal Highway Administration, state departments of transportation, National Center for Safe Routes to School and Safe Routes to School National Partnership. The second page includes a flow-chart diagram outlining the relationships further.

2010 Publications

The Second Wave: State Network Policy Changes in 20 States
This report describes the strategies, partners, successes and lessons learned from the Safe Routes to School state network project in 20 states during 2010.

State Network Policy Successes
In 2010 and 2011, the 20 state networks engaged more than 600 partner organizations and agencies in policy priorities based upon the following policy categories: state Safe Routes to School program, Complete Streets, School Siting, Personal Safety, Low-Income Communities, Statewide Curriculum and Education, Strategic Highway Safety Plan, Implementation of Safe Routes to School-Related Legislation, School Bus Funding, School Wellness Policies and Fine-Based Funding Mechanisms. The report titled State Network Policy Successes, December 2010 provides selected accomplishments from the 20 state networks during 2010, and from the 10 networks during the first three years of the program.

The National Partnership’s 2011-2015 Strategic Plan
The Safe Routes to School National Partnership's 2011-2015 final Strategic Plan was adopted by our Steering Committee on November 3, 2010. A sincere thank you goes out to the nearly 1,000 people who were interviewed, completed a survey, attended our annual meeting and/or provided written comments on the draft strategic plan. With your help, we believe that we have successfully honed in on the most important goals, focus areas, objectives and tactics to ensure a strong and sustainable Safe Routes to School movement and a world in which children can safely walk and bicycle to school, and in daily life. We look forward to working with our partners to advance the Safe Routes to School movement through the implementation of our Strategic Plan in the coming years. The Executive Summary of the Strategic Plan is also available for viewing.

Implementing Safe Routes to School in Low-Income Schools and Communities: A Resource Guide for Volunteers and Professionals
The Safe Routes to School National Partnership has developed a Low-Income Guide for assisting volunteers and professionals with implementing Safe Routes to School in low-income schools and communities. This resource guide provides parents, nonprofit leaders, school personnel and local government officials with creative and effective solutions to make it safer for more children to walk and bicycle to and from school in low-income communities. For a hi-res version of this guide, please contact Margo Pedroso.

Getting Students Active through Safe Routes to School: Policies and Action Steps for Education Policymakers and Professionals
The Safe Routes to School National Partnership has developed an Educator's Guide for getting students active through Safe Routes to School. Education policymakers and professionals are charged with one of the most critical roles in our society—ensuring that all students have the opportunity to learn in an environment that is safe and that nurtures their intellectual, social and physical growth. For a hi-res version of this guide, please contact Margo Pedroso.

Safe Routes to School Low-Income Program Evaluation Report
The Safe Routes to School National Partnership in collaboration with UC Berkeley’s Safe Transportation Research and Education Center and PPH Partners, released the report, Safe Routes to School - Local School Project: A health evaluation at 10 low-income schools. This comprehensive report analyzes the ten schools from the Local School Project.

2009 Publications

Safe Routes to School: Putting Traffic Safety First - How Safe Routes to School Initiatives Protect Children Walking and Bicycling
The Safe Routes to School National Partnership has released a new national report showing how SRTS programs can be harnessed to keep children safe from traffic dangers while walking and bicycling to school. The report explores the approaches five different communities used through SRTS to create safer environments for children walking and bicycling. The five communities (Santa Rosa, CA; Miami-Dade County, FL; state of ME; Springfield, MO; and Portland, OR) each demonstrate how Safe Routes to School evaluation, education, encouragement, enforcement, and engineering can address traffic safety concerns. Many of these safety improvements are made at relatively low costs to communities and schools, yet have profound effects on keeping children safe while also improving physical health and the environment.

Safe Routes to School State Network Project: Final Report, 2007-2009, Making Change Through Partners and Policies
The Safe Routes to School National Partnership launched the State Network Project in 2007 to influence state-level Safe Routes to School implementation and to leverage additional resources and build a supportive environment through other state-level policies. The 2007–2009 Report describes the approach and structure of the Partnership’s State Network and Local School Projects in 10 jurisdictions (CA, DC, GA, IL, KY, LA, NY, OK, TX and VA). The networks were selected primarily based on high levels of childhood obesity, diversity and low income communities. The report highlights the progress achieved at state and local levels over three years, including major accomplishments, lessons learned, and next steps.

Safe Routes to School 2009 Policy Report – Moving to the Future: Building on Early Achievements
This report gives some background information on Safe Routes to School and details challenges and opportunities in program implementation. The 2009 Policy Report also discuses a number of “big-picture” policies and practices that affect—positively or negatively—the ability of children to walk and bicycle to school or that can help institutionalize SRTS programs in a larger context. Some of these policies include school siting, complete streets, school bus route cuts, and more.

2008 Publications

Safe Routes to School: Steps to a Greener Future
This report indicates how Safe Routes to School is reducing carbon emissions and air pollutants. The report profiles five communities that have made strides in reducing carbon dioxide emissions and harmful pollutants around schools through the implementation of Safe Routes to School programs. The five case studies documented in this report demonstrate initial promising successes, and show how one school’s effort often spreads to additional nearby schools, furthering the environmental impact. Columbia, MO; Las Cruces, NM; Longmont, CO; Marin County, CA; and Windsor, VT are featured. Please contact Margaux Mennesson for a high resolution electronic copy of the report.

Safe Routes to School State Network Project: 2008 Annual Progress Report - Building Momentum and Policy Change
This report provides an update on major State Network Project accomplishments in 2008, lessons learned, state summaries, and the Local School Project.

Safe Routes to School: Improves the Built Environment
This report focuses on case studies describing how ten states (California, District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, New York, Oklahoma, Texas and Virginia) are awarding their SRTS federal funds to support improved infrastructure such as sidewalks, bike lanes, pathways, improved intersections, traffic calming, and more. Safe Routes to School: Improves the Built Environment shares information on local level implementation challenges, best practices, and securing more improvements to the built environment in your community. Please contact Margaux Mennesson for a high resolution electronic copy of the report.

Safe Routes to School: Leads to Greater Collaboration with Public Health and School Officials
This report demonstrates how Safe Routes to School is a collaborative effort involving multiple organizations, including state Departments of Education and state Departments of Public Health. Additionally, the report addresses how school siting decisions at the state and local levels affect opportunities to walk and bicycle to schools, which in turn affects opportunities for physical activity. The four case studies showcase examples of collaboration between public health and school officials at the state level through Safe Routes to School Advisory Committees, school siting guidelines, state standards for physical activity or wellness policies and more. California, Massachusetts, Mississippi and Oklahoma are featured. Please contact Margaux Mennesson for a high resolution electronic copy of this report.

Safe Routes to School: Increases Physical Activity and Improves Health
This report indicates how Safe Routes to School is being institutionalized at select schools, and providing a mechanism to improve student and school health. It provides local case studies from Benton County, OR; Eau Claire, WI; Flagstaff, AZ; and Garfield, NJ that detail how SRTS can lead to improved public health. Please contact Margaux Mennesson for a high resolution copy of this report.

Safe Routes to School: State Networks Create Policy Change
The Safe Routes to School National Partnership is implementing the State Network Project to ensure program success and leverage resources by creating SRTS State Networks in nine states and the District of Columbia. The following report outlines how State Networks can create policy change. Click here to view it in full. Please contact Margaux Mennesson for a high resolution copy of this report.

Safe Routes to School: Progress in Implementing the Program but a Comprehensive Plan to Evaluate Program Outcomes is Needed
The U.S. GAO report on Safe Routes to School was released on July 31, 2008. To read the SRTSNP analysis of the GAO report, click here.

Safe Routes to School: A Transportation Legacy
The National Safe Routes to School Task Force released its final report entitled Safe Routes to School: A Transportation Legacy – A National Strategy to Increase Safety and Physical Activity among American Youth. To access and download a full copy of the document, please visit http://www.saferoutesinfo.org/task_force/.

Safe Routes to School: A Catalyst for Building Partnerships and Leveraging Resources
This report showcases how SRTS programs are resulting in the implementation of infrastructure improvements that close gaps in the non-motorized transportation network. Click here to read more about the four communities that were showcased – Avondale, AZ; Bozeman, MT; Knoxville, TN; and Miami, FL.

Establishing a Safe Routes to School State Network: A 10-Step Guide
This report describes a process that can be used in any state to bring together diverse partners, create a SRTS State Network, and initiate policy changes that will make it safer and easier for children to be able to walk and bicycle to schools.

2007 Publications

2007 Safe Routes to School: State of the States Report
This report serves as an educational piece for Congressional members on the progress of Safe Routes to School. The report includes an executive summary, successes of the federal SRTS program, lessons learned, challenges, funding information, and recommendations for the future of SRTS. An updated version of the State of the States chart can be found here.