A Brief History Lesson: Academic Performance and Physical Activity

This guest blog post was written by our research adviser, Christina Galardi.

academic girls

First, let’s start with a pop quiz to get your brain working - I’ll give the answers at the end.

Safe Routes to School: The Story Begins

This is the first in a series of blog posts highlighting pivotal moments in the history of the Safe Routes to School movement.

Dear Deb and Wendi: Thank you so much for creating the Safe Routes to School program sixteen years ago. It has really made a difference at Kent Middle School. I now walk to school every day I have a chance to. Sixty percent of our school now travels green, and it is truly because of the commitment you two have made. – Kent Middle School student, 2015

Graduate Student Learns to Count on Walk and Bike to School Day

This guest blog post was written by our research adviser, Christina Galardi.

Back to the basics: even though I’ve completed college-level mathematics courses, this month I returned to elementary school for an important lesson in my 1,2,3’s.

Safe Routes to School in Rural (Yes, Rural) New Jersey

Nora ShepardMost people think of New Jersey as an urban place -- after all, it has the highest population density in the country. There are many dense urban cities and suburban communities, but there are also large rural areas with small towns and open spaces. Contrary to what you might initially think, there are lessons to be learned in New Jersey about Safe Routes to School in rural settings.

Exploring Collaboration Between Safe Routes to School and School Bus Professionals

school bus reportToday, most student transportation departments around the country focus primarily on getting students to school on yellow school buses. But student transportation isn’t just about school buses. Students are also getting to school by foot, bicycle, car, and public transportation.

Rural School District Finds Success in Creating a Safe Routes to School District Policy

Last fall, in the rural community of Winton, California, there was lot of excitement building around walking, bicycling and Safe Routes to School. Winton is a small town with two schools less than two miles apart from each other, and parents and community members had been frustrated about the congestion that was created when schools released students at the end of the day. Parents wanted to be able to walk or bicycle to school with their children, but couldn’t because of a lack of sidewalks and infrastructure. The district needed a solution.

Active Kids Are Doing Better at This Rhode Island School

This South Providence Elementary School Had a Chronic Absenteeism Problem. Then They Started a Walking School Bus. 

At first, the maps didn’t make sense. Why would the kids who lived closest to school – all within one mile – have the most problems with chronic absenteeism? 

How a School in Virginia Got Full Participation in a Walking School Bus

Based on an interview with principal Anne Lintner and home-school liaison Sonny Rodriguez of Keister Elementary School in Harrisonburg, VA.

Important Update About Deb Hubsmith

Last week, while visiting the doctor for flu-like symptoms, Safe Routes to School National Partnership director Deb Hubsmith was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This type of leukemia comes on very quickly, and Deb's doctors caught it early and started treatment right away. She will be in and out of the hospital over the next couple of months while going through chemotherapy. Once treated, AML has a good remission and survival rate. Her doctors fully expect remission following her treatment course. 

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