#10YearsofSRTS: Walk to School Day: A Bellwether for the Demand for Active Communities

wtsdSince the first U.S. event in 1997, Walk to School Day has become the cornerstone annual event for champions of Safe Routes to School, walking and bicycling. Each year, Walk to School Day celebrations break records for participation, with more than 4,780 events being held in 2014. And in many communities, Walk to School Day events are just one part of a school’s efforts to embrace active lifestyles.

National Partnership Mourns the Passing of Its Founder, Deb Hubsmith

Written by Risa Wilkerson, Safe Routes to School National Partnership Board Chair

Deb HubsmithIt is with a heavy heart today that the Safe Routes to School National Partnership (National Partnership) mourns the passing of its founder, Deb Hubsmith. Her family announced the news yesterday afternoon.

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina Reaches the Complete Streets Finish Line

The oceanfront city of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina – permanent population 27,000 – explodes with tourists and temporary workers from all over the world during the summer. With as many as 450,000 people congregating on the seven-mile stretch of beachfront, restaurants, and shops in any given week in the summer, it’s critical that the town’s transportation system is able to handle the large influx of visitors. Central to the experience of visiting Myrtle Beach is the ability to get out of the car and enjoy the town by foot or by bike.

#10YearsofSRTS: Smart Steps and a Clear Vision

When Deb Hubsmith founded the National Partnership in 2005 – the same year that the first federal Safe Routes to School legislation was passed, authorizing funding to 50 states and the District of Columbia – her vision for the Safe Routes to School movement was much broader than the $612 million in initial funding outlined in the legislation. From the very beginning, Hubsmith believed that Safe Routes to School had the potential to transform our cities and towns into healthy, active communities where all people can walk, bicycle, and be physically active.

A Brief History Lesson: Academic Performance and Physical Activity

This guest blog post was written by our research adviser, Christina Galardi.

academic girls

First, let’s start with a pop quiz to get your brain working - I’ll give the answers at the end.

Safe Routes to School: The Story Begins

This is the first in a series of blog posts highlighting pivotal moments in the history of the Safe Routes to School movement.

Dear Deb and Wendi: Thank you so much for creating the Safe Routes to School program sixteen years ago. It has really made a difference at Kent Middle School. I now walk to school every day I have a chance to. Sixty percent of our school now travels green, and it is truly because of the commitment you two have made. – Kent Middle School student, 2015

Graduate Student Learns to Count on Walk and Bike to School Day

This guest blog post was written by our research adviser, Christina Galardi.

Back to the basics: even though I’ve completed college-level mathematics courses, this month I returned to elementary school for an important lesson in my 1,2,3’s.

Safe Routes to School in Rural (Yes, Rural) New Jersey

Nora ShepardMost people think of New Jersey as an urban place -- after all, it has the highest population density in the country. There are many dense urban cities and suburban communities, but there are also large rural areas with small towns and open spaces. Contrary to what you might initially think, there are lessons to be learned in New Jersey about Safe Routes to School in rural settings.

Exploring Collaboration Between Safe Routes to School and School Bus Professionals

school bus reportToday, most student transportation departments around the country focus primarily on getting students to school on yellow school buses. But student transportation isn’t just about school buses. Students are also getting to school by foot, bicycle, car, and public transportation.

Pages