Blog posts that match your criteria

“Turning over” new Safe Routes to School jobs in North Carolina

Terry LansdellIn North Carolina this year, thanks to the North Carolina Department of Transportation’s (NCDOT) Safe Routes to School Coordinator Ed Johnson, the waters are “turning over” for Safe Routes to School and the prioritization of bicycle and pedestrian safety in a variety of ways and partnerships. 

Students Steal the Show

Christine GreenI recently had the privilege of speaking at the Fairfax County Bike Summit. It was the first Bike Summit in the county. Fairfax County has come a long way through the work of the Fairfax Advocates for Better Bicycling.

California’s Cap-and-Trade Program: Continuing Opportunities for Active Transportation Advocates

Freemont Elementary School 2012California’s climate change legislation continues to provide opportunities for bicycle and pedestrian advocates to influence regional transportation policy and finance.

Exercise Your Right to…Exercise

kelechiThe past several months have been rife with debates, campaign speeches and rallies supporting certain candidates, ideologies and policies. Over the past couple of weeks, many Americans have exercised their right to vote into office the state and local leaders of their choice as well as the President of the United States of America.

It Takes A Unified Effort

Jay ThompsonOver the last few months, a great deal of momentum and synergy has been built around schools and communities initiating joint use (or shared use) agreements, which allow for the sharing of property between two entities to increase physical activity and improve nutrition among their residents. Although these efforts are good and collaborations such as these have served as a

Making the Match: Finding Funding for Future Safe Routes to School Projects

Margo PedrosoWith the issuance of the new interim guidance for the new Transportation Alternatives program under MAP-21, we now know for sure that future Safe Routes to School projects no longer have the luxury of being 100 percent funded by federal transportation dollars. Now, project sponsors will need to find a way to put up 20 percent of